Course Overview


Landmarks

Amen Corner

The name Amen Corner refers to hole Nos. 11, 12 and 13. Amen Corner was first coined in a 1958 Sports Illustrated article by Herbert Warren Wind, who wrote that it was composed of the second half of hole No. 11, hole No. 12 and the first half of hole No. 13. Wind was searching for an appropriate name for the location where the critical action had taken place that year. He borrowed the name from an old jazz recording "Shoutin' in that Amen Corner".

Saturday evening in 1958, heavy rains soaked the course. For Sunday's round, a local rule was adopted allowing a player whose ball was embedded to lift and drop it without penalty. Sunday on No. 12, Arnold Palmer hit his ball over the green and the ball embedded in the steep bank behind it. Being uncertain about the applicability of the local rule, the official on the hole and Palmer agreed that the ball should be played as it lay and that Palmer could play a second ball which he dropped. Palmer holed out for a 5 with the original ball and a 3 with the second ball. The committee was asked to decide if the local rule was applicable and if so, which score should count.

At No. 13, still unsure of what his score was at 12, Palmer sank an 18-foot putt for eagle 3. When he was playing No. 15, Palmer was told his drop at 12 was proper and that his score on the hole was 3, leading to his first major victory.

Rae's Creek

Named after John Rae, who died in 1789, Rae's Creek runs in front of No. 12 green, has a tributary evident at No. 13 tee, and flows at the back of No. 11 green. It was Rae's house which was the farthest fortress up the Savannah River from Fort Augusta. The house kept residents safe during Indian attacks when the fort was out of reach.

Ornamentals

"The big oak tree" on the golf course side of the Clubhouse is a live oak, Quercus virginiana. It was planted when the building was completed in the late 1850s, making the tree approximately 145-150 years old. Several other live oaks were planted on the grounds about the same time. The "big oak" is one of the favorite gathering places during the Masters Tournament.

The privet hedge at the Club was developed from plants imported from France by the Berckmans. There are thousands of miles of privet hedge in the South which were propagated from this original source.

The wisteria vine, Wisteria sinensis, most noticeable on the Aphananthe aspera tree next to the Clubhouse, is reported to be one of the first wisteria to be established in the U.S. It is also believed to be the largest vine of its kind in the country.

The most abundant tree at Augusta National is the pine. The predominant specie is the Loblolly Pine, Pinus taeda, with a scattering of Shortleaf Pines, Pinus echinata, and Slash Pines, Pinus elliottii. There are also several Longleaf Pines, Pinus palustris, and Eastern White Pines, Pinus strobus, found on the property. Many of the pines found in the original forested part of the course are over 150 years old (i.e., hole No. 10), while many others were planted when the course was built (i.e., hole No. 3). Azaleas and dogwoods are also in abundance. There are over 30 varieties of azaleas, several strains of dogwood and dozens of varieties of ornamental shrubs on the grounds.

Surprisingly, there are a few palm trees on the course. At one point during the course's early years, hole No. 4 was called the Palm Hole.

Eisenhower Tree

Located at hole No. 17, the Eisenhower Tree is approximately 210 yards from the Masters tee and left-center of the fairway. The loblolly pine is approximately 65 feet high and about 100 to 125 years old. The former President of the US and Club member hit into the tree so often he campaigned to have it removed. At a Club's governors meeting in 1956, Eisenhower proposed cutting the tree down. Clifford Roberts promptly ruled him out of order and adjourned the meeting. The pine has been linked to Eisenhower since then.

Magnolia Lane

The 61 large magnolia trees that line both sides of Magnolia Lane date back to approximately the late 1850s and were planted as seeds by the Berckmans. In 1947, Magnolia Lane was paved for the first time. It is approximately 330 yards long, extending from the entrance gate to the Clubhouse.

Founders Circle

Located at the base of the flagpole in front of the Clubhouse, the Founders Circle features two plaques dedicated to founding members Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts.

ROBERT TYRE JONES, JR.
MARCH 17, 1902 - DECEMBER 18, 1971

Co-Founder and President of Augusta National Golf Club and Masters Tournament

A Gentleman in every sense of the word whose legendary feates as a golfer will inspire those who play the game in all the years to come

Presented in honor of Robert Tyre Jones, Jr. by the Members of Augusta National Golf Club on this 18th day of March, 1978

CLIFFORD ROBERTS.
MARCH 6, 1894 - SEPTEMBER 29, 1977

Co-Founder and Chairman of Augusta National Golf Club and Masters Tournament

A man whose vision was inspired by genius and given substance through determination

His contributions to the game of golf will be remembered as long as the game is played

Presented in honor of Clifford Roberts by the Members of Augusta National Golf Club on this 5th day of November, 1977

Bridges

There are three bridges dedicated at Augusta National Golf Club. They are:

THE HOGAN BRIDGE AT NO. 12 GREEN

THIS BRIDGE DEDICATED APRIL 2, 1958, TO COMMEMORATE BEN HOGAN'S RECORD SCORE FOR FOUR ROUNDS OF 274 IN 1953. MADE UP OF ROUNDS OF 70, 69, 66 AND 69, THIS SCORE WILL ALWAYS STAND AS ONE OF THE VERY FINEST ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN COMPETITIVE GOLF AND MAY EVEN STAND FOR ALL TIME AS THE RECORD FOR THE MASTERS TOURNAMENT.
-DEDICATED APRIL 2, 1958

THE NELSON BRIDGE AT NO. 13 TEE

THIS BRIDGE DEDICATED APRIL 2, 1958, TO COMMEMORATE BYRON NELSON'S SPECTACULAR PLAY ON THESE TWO HOLES (12 - 13) WHEN HE SCORED 2-3 TO PICK UP SIX STROKES ON RALPH GULDAHL AND WIN THE 1937 MASTERS TOURNAMENT. IN RECOGNITION ALSO TO GULDAHL, WHO CAME BACK WITH AN EAGLE 3 ON 13 TO GAIN WINNING POSITION IN 1939.

THE SARAZEN BRIDGE AT NO. 15 GREEN

ERECTED TO COMMEMORATE THE TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FAMOUS "DOUBLE EAGLE" SCORED BY GENE SARAZEN ON THIS HOLE, APRIL 7, 1935, WHICH GAINED HIM A TIE FOR FIRST PLACE WITH CRAIG WOOD AND IN THE PLAY-OFF WON THE SECOND MASTERS TOURNAMENT.
-DEDICATED APRIL 6, 1955


Other Points of Interest

Crow's Nest

Available for amateurs wishing to be housed there during the Masters Tournament, the Crow's Nest provides living space for up to five individuals. Rising from the approximately 30 by 40 foot room is the Clubhouse's 11 foot square cupola. The cupola features windows on all sides and can only be reached by ladder.

The Crow's Nest consists of one room with partitions and dividers that create three cubicles with one bed each, and one cubicle with two beds. There is also a full bathroom with an additional sink. The sitting area has a game table, sofa and chairs, telephone and television. Placed throughout the Crow's Nest are books on golf, and lining the walls are photos and sketches depicting past Masters and other golfing scenes. Players that were then amateurs who stayed in the Crow's Nest include Jack Nicklaus, Ben Crenshaw and Tiger Woods.

Masters Club

Better known as the "Champions dinner", the Masters Club began during the 1952 Tournament when defending champion Ben Hogan gave a dinner for all previous winners. At that time he proposed the formation of the Masters Club with its membership limited to Masters champions. Honorary memberships were also extended to Bob Jones and Clifford Roberts. Bill Lane, Hord Hardin, Jack Stephens, Hootie Johnson and Billy Payne have subsequently been added as honorary members. Each year the defending champion selects the menu and acts as host for the Tuesday night dinner. As his certificate of membership, he receives an inscribed gold locket in the form of the Club emblem.

Ike's Pond

It was during his second visit to Augusta National that General Eisenhower walked through the woods on the eastern part of the Club's property. Upon his return, he informed Clifford Roberts that he had found a perfect place to build a dam if the Club ever wished to have a fishpond. Ike's Pond was promptly built and named, and the dam was located exactly where Ike suggested it should be placed, the construction engineer concurring in the location. The Pond occupies three acres and is fed by a spring.

Par 3 Fountain

Similar in design to the fountains on the Augusta National Golf Club grounds, the Par 3 Fountain is located adjacent to the No. 1 tee on the Par 3 course. On this Fountain is a list of Par 3 Contest winners beginning with Sam Snead's inaugural victory in 1960.

Record Fountain

Dedicated March 3, 1959, the 25th anniversary of the Masters, a multiple unit drinking fountain was unveiled to accommodate Tournament patrons. Left of No. 17 tee, the hexagonal Record Fountain displays a progression of course records and the names and scores of Masters Tournament winners.

Arnold Palmer Plaque

The Arnold Palmer Plaque was dedicated April 4, 1995, commemorating Palmer's play and contributions to the Masters. Palmer played competitively in 50 consecutive Masters since his first appearance in 1955. His four Masters victories, 1958, 1960, 1962 and 1964, are chronicled and the bronze plaque is affixed to a drinking fountain behind No. 16 tee.

Jack Nicklaus Plaque

The Jack Nicklaus Plaque was dedicated April 7, 1998, to honor the six-time Masters champion. Nicklaus won his first title at age 23 and became the youngest champion at that time. Affixed to a drinking fountain between hole Nos. 16 and 17, the bronze plaque chronicles Nicklaus' victories, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1972, 1975 and 1986, as well as his numerous contributions to the Masters.

The Green Jacket

The Augusta National member's green coat began in 1937. Jackets were purchased from the Brooks Uniform Company, New York City. Members were urged to buy and wear a Jacket during the Masters Tournament so patrons would be able to identify a reliable source of information. Members were not initially enthusiastic about wearing the warm, green coat. Within several years, a lightweight, made-to-order Jacket was available from the Club's Golf Shop. In 1949, the first Green Jacket was awarded to that year's Masters champion, Sam Snead. The single breasted, single vent Jacket's color is "Masters Green" and is adorned with an Augusta National Golf Club logo on the left chest pocket. The logo also appears on the brass buttons.

Traditionally, the champion takes his Jacket home with him for one year, returning it to the Club when he returns for the Tournament. The Jacket is then stored at Augusta National Golf Club and is available whenever the champion visits. Near the conclusion of the Masters, several Jackets are selected which could fit the possible winner during the presentation ceremony. The winner will have his measurements taken at the Club's Golf Shop or may provide measurements so that a custom made Green Jacket can be tailored. Typically, a multiple winner will have only one Green Jacket unless his size drastically changes.

It is the custom at the Masters Tournament that the winner from the previous year presents the Green Jacket to the new winner and helps him into it. In 1966, Jack Nicklaus became the first champion to win consecutive Tournaments. Bob Jones recommended that Nicklaus act in a dual capacity, and put on his own coat. Nicklaus proceeded to slip into his own Green Jacket, much to the enjoyment of the crowd.

In 1990, Nick Faldo became the second champion to win consecutive Tournaments. This time Chairman Hord W. Hardin assisted the winner into his Green Jacket. When Tiger Woods won in 2002, he became the third champion to win consecutive Tournaments. At the Presentation Ceremony, Chairman Hootie Johnson assisted Woods into his Green Jacket.


Fun Facts about the Masters

Bob Jones and Clifford Roberts organized the first event, later named the Masters Tournament, at Augusta National in 1934.

The Masters Tournament was called the "Augusta National Invitational" for the first five years (1934-1938).

The first tournament was held March, 22 1934. Since 1940 however, the Masters was scheduled for the first full week in April each year.

Horton Smith won the first tournament in 1934.

Jack Nicklaus has the most Masters Tournament wins, with six.

Jack Nicklaus became the oldest player to win a Masters Tournament, at 46 years, 2 months and 23 days - in 1986.

Tiger Woods was the youngest player to win a Masters Tournament, at 21 years, 3 months and 14 days - in 1997.

In 1949, the first Green Jacket was awarded to that year's Masters champion, Sam Snead.

Amen Corner refers to holes No. 11, 12 and 13. In 1958, a Sports Illustrated writer, Herbert Warren Wind, named the second half of hole No. 11, hole No. 12 and the first half of hole No. 13 Amen Corner. This is where the critical action took place that year. He borrowed the name from an old jazz recording called "Shouting at Amen Corner."

Rae's Creek was named after John Rae. The creek runs in front of the No. 12 green, has a tributary at the No. 13 tee, and passes by the back of the No. 11 green. Rae's house kept residents safe during Indian attacks. It was the furthest fortress up the Savannah River from Fort Augusta.

The pine tree is the most abundant tree at Augusta. Several species grow along the course, including: Loblolly Pines, Shortleaf Pines, Slash Pines, Longleaf Pines, Eastern White Pines. "The big oak tree" on the golf course side of the Clubhouse is about 145-150 years old. This live oak tree was planted in the 1850's.

Magnolia Lane extends from the entrance gate to the clubhouse. The 61 large magnolia trees that line both sides of the 330-yard road date to the late 1850s.

Founders Circle is at the base of the flagpole in front of the clubhouse. Two plaques there honor the Masters' founders: Bob Jones and Clifford Roberts.

There are three dedicated bridges at Augusta National: the Sarazen Bridge at hole No. 15 -- to honor Gene Sarazen's double eagle there during the 1935 Masters, the Hogan Bridge at the No. 12 green -- to honor Ben Hogan's then record score of 274 in 1953, and the Nelson Bridge at the No. 13 tee -- to honor Byron Nelson's performance on holes No. 12 and 13 when he won the 1937 Masters.

The Crow's Nest provides housing for amateurs during the Masters Tournament. It has room for up to five players.

The Champions Dinner is for members of the Masters Club, those who have won a Masters Tournament, and is hosted by the defending champion on Tuesday of Masters week.

Ike's Pond is named after General Eisenhower. The three-acre Pond is manmade, has a dam and is fed by a spring. Eisenhower also has his own tree named after him. The Eisenhower Tree stands in left center of the fairway at hole No. 17, Ike hit the tree so often that he campaigned to have it removed.

The Par 3 Fountain is next to the No. 1 tee on the Par 3 course. This Fountain has a list of Par 3 contest winners, starting with Sam Snead's win in 1960.

The Record Fountain was built to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Masters. It is located left of the No. 17 tee and displays course records and Masters Tournament winners.

The 10 Augusta National Golf Club Cabins are located on the grounds of Augusta National and provide lodging for members and their guests. One of the cabins is named the Eisenhower Cabin because the Club built it for President and Mrs. Eisenhower for their visits to Augusta National.

The tournament was not played during the years 1943, 1944 and 1945 because of World War II. To help with the war effort, turkey and cattle were raised on the Augusta National Grounds.

No amateur has ever won the Masters.

No one has ever won the par three tournament and the Masters Tournament in the same year.

You cannot apply for membership. You can only be invited.

The first African-American member was admitted in 1990.

Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and former amateur standout and now Senior PGA Tour player John Harris are the only pro golfers who are members.

Avid golfer Dwight (Ike) Eisenhower is the only U.S. president to have been a club member. Ike's Pond occupies 3 acres near hole No. 9 on the par-3 course, a nine-hole layout that is the site of the traditional Par 3 Contest on Wednesday of Masters week.

The club was conceived by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Their vision was to establish a national membership for the club. They took a $70,000 option on a 365-acre property called Fruitland Nurseries in Augusta, Ga. Jones and Alistair Mackenzie of Scotland designed the course. Construction began in 1931. The course opened in 1932 with limited play. Formal opening was January 1933.

The club is open from mid-October to late May.

Each hole is named after a plant or shrub. For example, No. 3 is called "Flowering Crab Apple."

The tradition of members wearing green jackets began in 1937, when jackets were purchased from New York's Brooks Uniform Co. The idea was that Masters patrons easily could see members who would have accurate information.

The Crow's Nest is a 30-by-40-foot room atop the clubhouse available as living quarters for as many as five amateurs during The Masters.

Chairmen: William "Billy" Paine 2006-present; William (Hootie) Johnson, 1998-present; Jack Stephens, 1991-98; Hord Hardin, 1980-91; William Lane, 1976-80; Clifford Roberts, 1934-76.

A Jack Nicklaus plaque, honoring the six-time Masters champion, is affixed to a drinking fountain between holes 16 and 17. An Arnold Palmer plaque, commemorating the play and contributions of the four-time Masters winner, is affixed to a drinking fountain behind the No. 16 tee.